Jupiter lens series

Jupiter is a family of Zonnar-type anastigmata photographic lenses produced in the USSR since 1948. Most of the “Jupiters” are designed for small format cameras, but the same name is also used by some cinema lenses, as well as optics for special types of equipment.

Historical reference

Jupiter lenses appeared in the USSR after the end of the war, when design documentation, stocks of raw materials and production equipment for the manufacture of German photographic equipment were received at the expense of reparations. After 1945, all German patents were revoked by the countries of the Anti-Hitler coalition, and free copying of pre-war developments was allowed. The first “Jupiters” became the Soviet versions of Zeiss Sonnar lenses.

However, they are not literal copies, since the original Zonnars require certain types of optical glass that were not produced in the Soviet Union. Therefore, from July 1947 to April 1949, under the guidance of optician Mikhail Maltsev, 4 Zonnar lenses were re-calculated at GOI for the range of glasses available in the USSR. Nevertheless, until 1954, some of them were produced at KMZ from exported stocks of German glass called “Jupiter”. First of all, they copied the interchangeable lenses developed by Ludwig Bertele back in 1932 for Contax cameras: Zeiss Sonnar 50 / 1.5; Zeiss Sonnar 50 / 2.0 and Zeiss Sonnar 85 / 2.0. They were intended for a Soviet copy of the same cameras, the production of which was launched at the Kiev plant “Arsenal” under the name “Kiev”.

At the same time, in December 1947, the high-aperture Zeiss Sonnar 180 / 2.8 telephoto lens, intended for combining a rangefinder camera with a mirror attachment, was recalculated for Soviet glass. It was later released as Jupiter-6 for the newly launched Zenith. The successful launch of serial production of Soviet copies of the Zonnars made it possible to soon begin their own developments based on this concept. This is how lenses were created for the first SLR cameras and 16 mm film cameras. Due to the peculiarities of the optical principle laid down by Berthelet, most of the “Jupiters” were telephoto lenses with high aperture. At the time of the appearance of “Jupiter-3” it was the fastest normal lens in the USSR.

The exact values ​​of the focal lengths do not always coincide with the rounded numbers indicated on the frame and are given from the catalog of the lens developer GOI im. Vavilov.

Lenses “Jupiter”

  • Jupiter-3
  • Jupiter-4M
  • Jupiter-6
  • Jupiter-8
  • Jupiter 9
  • Jupiter-10
  • Jupiter 11
  • Jupiter-12
  • Jupiter-13
  • Jupiter-14
  • Jupiter-16
  • Jupiter-17
  • Jupiter-18
  • Jupiter-21
  • Jupiter-22
  • Jupiter-23
  • Jupiter-24
  • Jupiter-25C
  • Jupiter-29
  • Jupiter-30
  • Jupiter-36
  • Jupiter-37
  • Jupiter-38
  • Jupiter-39
  • Jupiter-100
  • Jupiter-200
 
Model Accession Focal length Aperture ratio Corner field
Jupiter-3 Kiev-Contax, М39 × 1 52.54 mm ƒ / 1.5 45 °
Jupiter-4M Kiev-Contax 50 mm ƒ / 2.0
Jupiter-6 M39 × 1, M42 × 1 180.29 mm ƒ / 2.8 14 °
Jupiter-8 Kiev-Contax, М39 × 1 52.4 mm ƒ / 2.0 45 °
Jupiter 9 М39 × 1, М42 × 1, Kiev-Contax, Kiev-Avtomat 84.46 mm ƒ / 2.0 28 ° 50 ′
Jupiter-10 17 mm ƒ / 1.8 45 °
Jupiter 11 М39 × 1, М42 × 1, Kiev-Contax, Kiev-Avtomat 133.12 mm ƒ / 4.0 18 ° 30 ′
Jupiter-12 М39 × 1, Kiev-Contax 35,7 mm ƒ / 2.8 63 °
Jupiter-13 125 mm ƒ / 1.5
Jupiter-14 19 mm ƒ / 1.8 45 °
Jupiter-16 50 mm ƒ / 2.0 41 °
Jupiter-17 M39 × 1, M24 × 1 52.49 mm ƒ / 2.0 45/27 °
Jupiter-18 19 mm ƒ / 1.8 42 °
Jupiter-21 M39 × 1, M42 × 1 200 mm ƒ / 4.0 12 °
Jupiter-22 75 mm ƒ / 2.0 35 °
Jupiter-23 M39 × 1 85 mm ƒ / 2.5 28 °
Jupiter-24 8 mm film 12.2 mm ƒ / 1.9 32 ° 30 ′
Jupiter-25C Bayonet C 85 mm ƒ / 2.5 28 °
Jupiter-29 74.88 mm ƒ / 1.8 10 °
Jupiter-30 M39 × 1 85 mm ƒ / 2.0 28 °
Jupiter-36 Bayonet B, Bayonet B 250 mm ƒ / 3.5 19 °
Jupiter-37 М42 × 1, K mount 135 mm ƒ / 3.5 18 °
Jupiter-38 M42 × 1 75 mm ƒ / 4.0 35 °
Jupiter-39 M42 × 1 135 mm ƒ / 5.6 18 °
Jupiter-100 OST-19 100 mm ƒ / 2.5 24 °
Jupiter-200 OST-19 200 mm ƒ / 4.0 12 °

Using lenses “Jupiter” on modern cameras

To work on digital SLRs you need a lens-to-camera adapter. The easiest way is to install Jupiter with M42x1 thread on Canon EF (-s). Jupiter with M39 thread for rangefinder cameras will only fit on mirrorless cameras without alterations. By ordering things from the links below, you help the project cover the costs of site maintenance and development. List of adapters, systems and mounts (direct links for ordering)

When ordering, it should be borne in mind that cheap adapters of poor quality with a lens on the Nikon F mount significantly spoil the picture. Adapters without a lens reduce the maximum focusing range (due to the difference in focal lengths). Adapters with chips come across of poor quality, exposure metering and confirmation of focus on some models of cameras may suffer from this.

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